free read Women of the Asylum Voices from Behind the Walls 1840 1945 ð PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB

review è PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ö Jeffrey L. Geller

Women of the Asylum Voices from Behind the Walls 1840 1945The 26 women who tell their stories here were incarcerated against their will often by male family members for holding views or beh. This book with its real life narratives was very difficult to read It’s frightening what women went through simply because of their genderThe book gives really good detail at what was going on in the time period of the narrative It details the political climate what was going on in terms of medical treatment and how women were treated and what was expected of themThe mere fact that the medical society thought that simply having a uterus was enough to cause mental illness is astounding and sickening at the same time Having a child was also a ualifier for having a mental illnessStepping outside the ridgid boundaries imposed on women and their conduct was enough to get a woman committed by her father brother or husband If a marriage was in trouble a husband could make a false accusation against his wife and have her locked upThe book doesn’t tell you if any of these women were actually mentally ill It just relays their stories in their own words But frankly even if they were the horrors they suffered as “treatment” are beyond imagination You think you’re reading a work of fiction when one woman tells about the near drowning water therapy or the forced insulin therapy that put the patient into a coma to “reboot” her brainUnfortunately you don’t find out what happened to most of these women after reading their horror stories Some of them were released others spent up to 24 years locked in asylumsIt was uite a shock to read It definitely wasn’t easy

free download Women of the Asylum Voices from Behind the Walls 1840 1945

free read Women of the Asylum Voices from Behind the Walls 1840 1945 ð PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ¼ The 26 women who tell their stories here were incarcerated against their will often by male family members for holding views or behaving in ways that deviated from the norms of their day S for women reveals the degree to which the prevailing societal conventions could reinforce the perception that these women were ma. I love first hand accounts of true events especially if those events were somewhat tragic and I especially love stories of women who have been considered insane or been institutionalized in one form another and this book was no exception The book features 26 first hand accounts of different women considered mad or insane spanning two centuries from 1840 1945 If there is a modern account covering the last half of the 20th century into the 21st I need to find itWhat the stories these women present is really an account of the strength of human endurance and a test of faith strength and survival Many women were suppressed oppressed and otherwise swept under the rug or “gotten rid of” for various reasons for by shipping them off to inanse asylums for periods of “rest” which often than not were anything but restful In a patriarchal society the reasons a woman could be carted off to the asylum ranged from her “delicate mental condition” to refusal to follow family or Church rules or simple defiance or disaobedience Conseuently these women were often abused in horrible ways in order to “cure” them of their willful ways ranging from rape beatings torture confinement in straightjackets or small cells or used as labor in laundries It’s fairly well known from a 21st century perspective that these are all methods used to break a person’s will but many of these women struggling and fighting valiantly managed to hold onto their minds and personalities although each and every one was invariably changed by their experiences Some of the women upon being released once they were “cured” worked outside the system for mental health care reform

Jeffrey L. Geller Ö 6 characters

Aving in ways that deviated from the norms of their day The authors' accompanying history of both societal and psychiatric standard. I had a hard time rating this book as a like because of the heart rending material in its pages First person written narratives from women committed to insane asylums does not make for easy reading Geller does an excellent job of introducing the various periods of time covered by the narratives and in providing an overview of the contemporary psychological practices and beliefs The women tell their stories in deep emotional words that depict the despair and utter devastation they suffered in asylums Committed by their families for unbelievable reasons not agreeing with a husband's beliefs daring to speak up at a public meeting being a spiritualist the women do not have any recourse to fight the incarceration process and to obtain their releases Sobering